The conversational framework and the ISE “Basketball Shot” video analysis activity

Vincent English, Yvonne Patricia Crotty, Margaret Anne Farren

Abstract


Inspiring Science Education (ISE) (http://www.inspiringscience.eu/) is an EU funded initiative that seeks to further the use of inquiry-based science learning (IBSL) through the medium of ICT in the classroom.

The Basketball Shot is a scenario (lesson plan) that involves the use of video capture to help the student investigate the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration. Using the LoggerPro® programme from Vernier Software and Technology (http://www.vernier.com/products/software/lp/), video is captured of a player throwing a ball towards the basket. The ball does not reach the basket, but instead bounces on the floor and continues its motion. The concept of constant velocity, vectors, acceleration in two dimensions is therefore demonstrated. Moreover, a connection with mathematics is established where the relevancy of linear and quadratic equations are clearly demonstrated in the context of the motion of the ball. The effectiveness of this lesson plan is evaluated through the lens of the “Conversational Framework” underpinned by the five stage inquiry-based learning approach.


Keywords


Digital artifact; inquiry-based learning; video capture; teaching conversational framework.

References


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