The Politics of Cotton in Eighteenth Century Spain

Authors

  • J.K.J. Thomson University of Sussex

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1344/rhi.v17i36.19862

Keywords:

Algodón, Política económica, España, Siglo XVIII

Abstract

As elsewhere in Europe Spain, confronted by an influx of oriental cotton imports, which originated in the sixteenth century and became significant from the second half of the seventeenth, ended by introducing a range of import restrictions on products containing the fibre. Prior to Charles II’s death these were piecemeal, discontinuous, varied from region to region and were generally ineffective but, following the confirmation of Philip V’s accession by the treaty of Utrecht, they were continuous and increasingly concerted for Spain’s extensive, global territories. The resulting legislation provided the parameters within which Spain’s cotton industry progressed during the 18th century. This article describes the legislative process itself, its intention being to identify the main determinants of legislation and thereby provide insights into the manner in which commercial and industrial policy was elaborated during the last years of the Old Regime

Published

2017-09-14

Issue

Section

Articles